Scribblers on Celluloid #7: A Murder of Crows

Posted: May 19, 2016 in Scribblers on Celluloid
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A Writer’s Review of: A Murder of Crows

a-murder-of-crows-movie-poster

Release Date: July 6, 1999

MPAA Rating: R

Starring: Cuba Gooding Jr., Tom Berenger, Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Eric Stoltz

Written by: Rowdy Herrington

Directed by: Rowdy Herrington

Spoiler Level: Medium.

 

 

Greetings, hacks and scribblers! How’s every little thing? Have your April showers done their job and showered you with flowers? My clogged head and itchy eyes are testament to April’s handiwork. Stupid April.

 

funny-Spring-allergy-tree-nature-cartoon

 

What have I been up to, you ask? I spent the month of April spitting out haikus for the A to Z Challenge, wherein those stupid—errr, brave enough to take the challenge were charged with producing 26 posts during the month of April, one for every letter of the alphabet. If you find this of interest, hop over HERE and check it out.

 

I’ve also been writing—my latest book, Searching for Willoughby: Rosebud Hill, Volume 1, should be out somewhere near the end of May, early June. I expect you all to go out and buy it, and you may rest assured I will holler a bit more loudly when it hits the cyber stands.

 

Rosebud Kindle

 

Anyhoo, I’m back, and if this installment of SoC doesn’t prove my dedication to bringing you reviews of movies about writers, then I don’t what else does. This one was hard to watch once, and I watched it twice. My martyrdom is established.

 

martyr

 

 

So then, onto #7. I give you A Murder of Crows.

 

 

The Whiz-Bang Synopsis:

A disbarred lawyer takes credit for a late friend’s book, which becomes a smash hit, but the tables turn on him sooner than he suspected.

 

The Slightly More Informative Although Slightly Inaccurate and Laced with Spoilers Synopsis:

In this suspenseful drama, a disbarred lawyer forgoes the writing of his own book in favor of taking credit for that of a writer who is murdered shortly after giving the attorney his unpublished manuscript to read. A murder-mystery, the book becomes a best-seller and once again the former lawyer finds himself at the top—until the circumstances of the real writer’s death and a series of other deaths lead police to accuse him of being a serial killer.

 

My Take on Things (or why this movie made the cut):

I debated for weeks as to whether A Murder of Crows should make the cut. The film has some issues. Well, a lot of issues, in my opinion. But, cliché-filled or not, there’s something here.

 

Entertainment Quotient:

Rotten Tomatoes (with a whopping 5 reviews) rated this movie as Rotten, while IMDb shows an overall rating of 6.40 stars out of 10. I’d say RT is pretty dead on, and IMDb may be a bit too generous.

At the risk of ripping the film apart before getting to the reason were all here, allow me to share some thoughts. I’ll spend a bit more time on this section than usual because, quite honestly, I can’t think of much to offer for writers in the other sections.

We open with a nighttime prison yard scene. All that razor wire, blue-gray tones, pouring rain. The camera slow-pans all this as Steve Porcaro’s (of Toto fame) bluesy score lets us know we are in store for some late-80s noir.

 

 

It’s sort of reminiscent of Clapton’s score on Lethal Weapon 2…oh, wait. That was 1989. A Murder of Crows came out in 1999. Unless this is deliberately set in an earlier time, or offered as homage, we could be in trouble.

I have to believe the noir-esque feel is intentional. If not, it’s kind of silly. Well, this film is silly much of the time, but again that’s my opinion.

This is a flashback movie. The movie begins near the end, with Lawson Russell (Cuba Gooding, Jr.) in prison, telling his story through voiceover. We are launched back to Mardi Gras where Lawson is lighting a cigarette while struggling with his conscience. The scene shifts between Lawson and a caped figure in a devil mask, making his stealthy way down narrow alleyways, picking the lock on a wrought iron gate, then into Lawson’s residence. He peers in from behind glass doors as Lawson picks up the phone. The devil has a gun and it is clear he means to use it. We see the other side of Lawson’s phone call where he attempts to remove himself from the case he’s about to try, defending a filthy-rich, Southern white-bread douchebag, Thurman Parker III, played to smarmy perfection by Eric Stoltz. When Lawson hangs up the phone, the devil-man is gone. “I didn’t know it at the time,” the voiceover informs us, “but that sudden act of conscience had saved my life.” Lawson Russell intentionally grenades his own case in front of the judge and jury; he is ultimately disbarred and so the plot is initiated.

Lawson tells a friend: “I’m gonna head down to Key West. Hell, I might even write a novel. I’m as smart as John Grisham.”

If only.

The overall tone (for me) would have been improved by eliminating the flashback element and simply telling the story from the opening scene in New Orleans. The continuous voiceover makes it seem like they are trying too hard to make it sound like a first-person detective novel.

The first scenes in Key West look to be 1970s stock footage. The colors are so muted it almost has the look of a well-filmed home movie. There’s no mention that I found indicating the story took place in the 70s or 80s, so I can only assume writer/director Rowdy Herrington wanted it to look dated. The 70s-sounding porn score doesn’t help. Interestingly, the dated, grainy look works well for the New Orleans scenes. It would’ve been nice to see some colorful contrast with the Key West scenes; as they stand, they actually make that beach haven look depressing.

While in Key West, Lawson takes up the role of small-boat fishing captain, where he meets Christopher Marlow, a character with one of the worst old-man makeup jobs I’ve ever seen. Turns out there is a reason for this, which I can’t divulge without spoiling a later development. Then again, that development isn’t all that much of a surprise. But that makeup was almost a deal-killer for me. At that point of the story, we’re supposed to believe that Marlow is what he claims to be, and we can only wonder why Lawson is not freaked out by the obvious fakery. Although he does say this through voiceover: “There was something very odd about Mr. Marlow. I couldn’t quite put my finger on it. I had no idea it was fate come calling.” I found myself wanting Lawson Russell to literally “put his finger on it” by reaching out and poking the rubbery old-man skin.

The two strike up an unlikely friendship, sharing drinks at the local bar. Lawson tells Marlow that he is working on a novel. And so the real story begins.

 

The Writerly Element:

If A Murder of Crows speaks to anything in the writer’s life, it is to greed. Or if not greed, then desire for recognition. We see it happen as Lawson sits staring at his computer (oh, the charm of that ancient Compaq), ubiquitous tumbler of whisky in his fist, struggling with writer’s block. Mr. Marlow shows up at Lawson’s door, and brings Lawson his own first novel. He tells Lawson that he (Marlow) is such a coward, he hasn’t told a soul he wrote it. He asks Lawson if he’ll give it a read. Then he leaves and the next day he’s dead, with no next of kin.

And of course the book, A Murder of Crows, is brilliant. We see Lawson back home at his computer. He types A Murder of Crows into a blank document, pauses with a nearly Snidely Whiplash twist of the lips, then types his own name in the byline.

Later (like in the next scene), Lawson Russell is in New York to meet the publisher where A Murder of Crows has been accepted for publication. And this is where all our writer wet dreams squirt onto the screen…so to speak.

We watch as Lawson shakes hands with the owner of the publishing company (yes, the owner, not some minimum-wage lackey) in the waiting room (she’s hot, of course); then she leads him through double doors where the entire editorial staff is waiting for him.

They are applauding.

There’s champagne, balloons, silver plates with yummy-looking food.

The entire room has been decorated for his book, with paper crows in trees, a wall-sized rendition of the book’s cover.

And everyone is happy and smiling.

Ya know something? I really don’t care how inaccurate this scene is. I don’t even care how bad this movie is. For those few seconds, all I wanted to do was be Lawson Russell, manuscript theft and all. Because that’s the dream, folks. Someone read our work and loved it. Loved it? Hell, they celebrated it. Bring on the dancing girls.

 

Why Bother:

You may not want to. I don’t think you’ll gain any real insight into the writing condition, but you may well enjoy the mystery. It’s a fairly interesting plot—if a bit convoluted—it just doesn’t come off well. Then again, it may work fine for you. Watch it for Mark Pellegrino’s performance as Professor Arthur Corvus, if for nothing else.

 

 

Overall Rating: 2 out of 5 Quills

 

 

Final Thoughts:

From Lawson Russell’s voiceover, just before Christopher Marlow shows up with the tempting morsel of his finished manuscript: “I’d been working on this book for over a year. Writing, my friends, is hard.”

I suppose that’s the resounding note for us hacks and scribblers. Writing is hard. Is it hard enough to steal another’s work? I hope it never becomes so. If it does—and you find yourself tempted to commit a little larceny—learn from Lawson Russell’s mistakes: check the purloined story’s facts and make darn sure it’s not written in blood.

 

If you’d like to catch up on earlier installments of Scribblers on Celluloid, click on the links below:

SoC: Introduction

SoC: The List

SoC #1

SoC #2

SoC #3

SoC #4

SoC #5

SoC #6

Oh, and go buy my books.

Keep up with what I’m doing here:

Website

Amazon

Goodreads

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