Scribblers on Celluloid #3: Tetro

Posted: March 1, 2015 in Scribblers on Celluloid
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A Writer’s Review of Tetro

tetro_movie-poster-02

Release Date: June 26, 2009

MPAA Rating: R

Starring: Vincent Gallo, Alden Ehrenreich, Maribel Verdú

Written by: Mauricio Kartun (verse “Fausta”), Francis Ford Coppola

Directed by: Francis Ford Coppola

Spoiler Level: Low.

Greetings, hacks and scribblers. I bet you thought you’d never hear from me again, now did you? As they say (or, as Robert Burns actually did say):

The best laid schemes o’ Mice an’ Men
Gang aft agley,

Loosely translated: Shit happens. In this case, lots of schemes are ganging aft agley all over the place. Several writing projects, including the blog countdown to the release of Relative Karma on audio. I plan to revisit my commitment to this particular series of writerly movies later, and will likely amend the list of movies somewhat. For now, I am quite happy with the increased activity in my writing world. All good things!

all good things

So, on to the movie at hand. I give you: Tetro!

The Whiz-Bang Synopsis:

Bennie travels to Buenos Aires to find his long-missing older brother, a once-promising writer who is now a remnant of his former self. Bennie’s discovery of his brother’s near-finished play might hold the answer to understanding their shared past and renewing their bond.

My Take on Things (or why this movie made the cut):

Two minutes into Tetro I knew I wanted this movie to make the cut. Ten minutes in and all doubts were gone. We have a tortured writer in Buenos Aries battling his inner demons. And it’s presented in gritty, black-and-white video. Yep, you bet it made the cut.

Entertainment Quotient:

Rotten Tomatoes averaged Tetro at 71% positive, labeling the movie as “Fresh.” On the whole, I’d say that’s a little lean.

Tetro is one of those films for which they like to use the term Work of Art. In this case I think they’re right. Coppola knows what he’s doing, and what he’s doing in this film is showing us why we all know his name…in a good way.

Beautifully filmed in black-and-white, which makes the Buenos Aires locale that much more real, you believe within minutes that you are there, climbing the soiled steps with young Bennie to Angelo Tetrocini’s apartment.

The video quality is noir-esque from the get-go, and lends a surreal vibe to the film as a whole. (There’s a bit of nudity here, as well, and just why is it that black-and-white nudity is so much sexier than color?).

Speaking of color, there are a good deal of flashbacks in the film and they are all rendered in color, with the aspect ratio shrinking to a slightly smaller inset screen, almost like watching a movie within a movie, which somehow serves to make the flashbacks less “real” than the current-day black-and-white.

It is artsy, yes, but effectively so. With the exception of the method of filming, there are few bells or whistles here—this is slow, measured story-telling. This film is, at times, very nearly reminiscent of Greek tragedy. In flashback we see the tortured (and torturous) relationship between Tetro and his father. We begin to sniff out the ugly plot twist in the film. We get uncomfortable until the story sweeps us away again. Then we find ourselves at the end and we remember the twist…we were right and we were wrong.

Beautifully handled story-telling.

The Writerly Element:

There is so much here to offer, from virtually every corner of the writing life. In no particular order, here are a few things to watch for…

During a performance of “Fausta,” (a delightfully weird retelling of Faust from a female perspective), a sun-glassed, fur-wearing critic walks in and sends the small crowd into an awed hush—the critic’s name is Alone (make of that what you will).

Another scene I watched several times because of the painful resonance was this slice of Ouch between Bennie and Tetro.

Bennie: “Will you get back to your writing?”

Tetro: “I walked away from that.”

Bennie: “How do you walk away from your work? Doesn’t it follow you?”

It does, brothers and sisters. If you are a writer—if it’s what you are wired to do—forget trying to get away. It will follow you.

Later, in another poignant moment, Tetro says: “Am I not okay the way I am? Not famous enough?” Ouch again.

As younger brother Bennie continues to be rejected by Tetro, he begins piecing together and transcribing Tetro’s abandoned writings. We see these as ragged pen-and-ink scribblings, written in code, written backwards.

Bennie: “They’re great stories, they just don’t have an ending.”

Tetro: “They don’t need an ending. You know why? Because my stories will never be published.”

In a scene that could easily stand for Tetro’s entire motivation throughout the movie, we see Tetro’s famous composer father in a flashback, speaking to his son just before Tetro leaves to go on a writing sabbatical:

“To make a living as a writer…you’d have to be a genius. And we already have a genius in the family.”

Why Bother:

There are maybe a hundred reasons why I think Tetro is an important movie for writers. The section above barely scratches the surface. In the end, though, I was left thinking not just about writers, but the poor souls damned to spend their lives at our sides.

Tetro touches deeply on the Crazy in writers, and paints a vivid picture of the people who live with them; how hard it must be to put up with a bipolar personality who fears his own words, and the interior horror that inspired them.

With all our latent (and not so latent) insanity…these saints love us anyway.

Living with a writer, and all that entails, can be something of a punchline, but there’s a point to be made. Writers (and artists in general) do seem to run a greater risk of drug and alcohol dependence, not to mention courting madness on one level or another. Depression is common. Suicide often beckons as a final way to still the voices.

Speaking personally, I am grateful with everything I have for my partner—she understands my giddy highs and festering lows. She stands by me, props me up. She is, simply and always, there.

Maribel Verdú does a wonderful job of portraying Tetro’s partner, Miranda, who originally met Tetro during his self-committed stay at the local looney bin. At one point, when Tetro is spiraling out of control, she says:

“I’ll be at the other insane asylum. I need a break to clear my head.”

And later, in a moment of such authenticity I found it hard to breathe:

“I’m the only one who’s always in your corner, always supporting you, the only person in this fucking life who loves you.”

Overall Rating: 5 out of 5 Quills.

Final Thoughts:

There is one moment in this film I hope I never forget, and I’ll leave you with this: Toward the end of the film, when the skeletons had been dragged screaming from their closets and into the limelight, the critic (Alone) finally takes notice. Tetro looks at her and says:

“Your opinion doesn’t matter to me anymore.”

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(Going forward, I will likely detour liberally from the original list. There are far too many movies, and far too little time to view them all and present them here. I will continue in the original order, but will skip over movies that I feel aren’t spot-on to the discussion at hand. I beg your forgiveness.)

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Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, what say you click on the image below and head over to the countdown? There be prizes, Precious, aye, prizes there be indeed.

Relative Karma - ACX FINAL

Comments
  1. jamesrovira says:

    Sold, man, I’m watching it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! Looks like one I may need to watch from the perspective of one who loves a writer.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. […] bells and whistles. But whereas Coppola worked his vision with a deft hand in Tetro (see SoC #3), it seems here like someone doing […]

    Like

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